The Green School in Bali was founded by Cynthia and John Hardy in September 2008 from a dream to create an inspiring learning space outside of the structural, conceptual, and physical limitations of a traditional school. Its mission, centered around a Green Studies and Creative Arts curriculum, is complemented by its ecologically-sustainable design. The classrooms have no walls and the school is located along the Ayung River in an undeveloped jungle area; the site itself is landscaped and farmed to maximize safety and productive outdoor learning opportunities.

This video features interviews with Global Awareness Teacher Glenn Chickering and Environmental Science Teacher Andrea Vecchione, as well as footage of the unique features of the school and the way students interact within it. Each teacher speaks about the benefits and challenges of teaching in a school without walls and how they hope their students will be shaped by this rare opportunity to experience education and nature in tandem.

Share your thoughts or ask the teachers questions in the ongoing discussion on Vialogues.

Excerpts from the discussion

@02:52 Ting: One more hidden curriculum here is to teach about how to be focused with the natural world around; the "bamboo cathedral" contains amazing possibilities that can help to create multiple learning and social spaces for children.

@03.14 Katezvdp: "We hear each other teaching" this is an interesting distinction re: benefits of an open-plan "lab" learning environment. Are there any major drawbacks? @03:14 sirnoan: Initially many teachers find it hard to deal with the transition, but from a practical standpoint I find that having a more open classroom concept allows for greater interaction between faculty. I often jump into my colleagues classes, and vice versa.